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Ontario proposes feed-in-tariffs

Ontario has proposed feed-in-tariffs (FiTs) for renewable energy generated from sources such as onshore and offshore wind, hydroelectric, solar, biogas, biomass and landfill gas.

Deputy Premier and Minister of Energy and Infrastructure, George Smitherman, says: “The proposed feed-in-tariff programme would help spark new investment in renewable energy generation and create a new generation of green jobs.”

“Ontario has made great progress in procuring renewables, becoming Canada’s leading province for wind power,” adds Colin Andersen, CEO of the Ontario Power Authority. “This proposed FiT programme would build on our success and ensure that more contracts turn into projects sooner.” 

The proposed Green Energy Act (GEA), if passed, could establish Ontario as North America’s leader in renewable energy, drive green investment in the province and create 50,000 jobs in the first three years. 

Additional changes proposed under the Green Energy Act would also make it easier and faster for projects to get connected to the grid. 

Solar micro-generation (≤10 kW) will enjoy the highest tariff. If the proposed FiT programme leads to 100,000 residential solar rooftop installations, it will amount to 1% of Ontario’s supply mix. (See image on the right.)

Proposed Feed-In Tariff Prices
for Renewable Energy Projects in Ontario

Technology

Proposed size tranches

Proposed ¢/kWh

Biomass*

 

 

 

Any size

12.2

Biogas*

 

 

 

≤ 5 MW

14.7

 

> 5 MW

10.4

Waterpower*

 

 

 

≤ 50 MW

12.9

Community Based

≤ 2 MW

13.4

Landfill gas*

 

 

 

≤ 5MW

11.1

 

> 5 MW

10.3

Solar PV

 

 

Rooftop

≤ 10 kW

80.2

 

10 – 100 kW

71.3

 

100 – 500 kW

63.5

 

> 500 kW

53.9

Ground Mounted 

≤ 10 MW

44.3

Wind

 

 

Onshore

Any size

13.5

Offshore

Any size

19.0

Community Based

≤ 10 MW

14.4

*on/off peak pricing applies

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This article is featured in:
Bioenergy  •  Energy efficiency  •  Energy infrastructure  •  Green building  •  Other marine energy and hydropower  •  Photovoltaics (PV)  •  Policy, investment and markets  •  Solar electricity  •  Solar heating and cooling  •  Wind power

 

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