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Solar cooling market ripe

The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety BMU is promoting a widespread test for solar air-conditioning, also known as solar cooling systems.

The partners involved - Solvis GmbH & Co. KG, SorTech AG, the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE and the University of Applied Sciences Offenburg – are presently looking for participants for the solar cooling test.

In the cooperative project 10 solar cooling systems with a power range of 5-30 kW are to be installed and equipped with measuring instruments.

Compared to conventional cooling techniques, electricity savings of up to 80% can be realised with solar-driven adsorption chillers. In addition, no environmentally harmful substances are used for the cold production – rather, just pure water is used as refrigerant.

The components used are high-quality products from the company Solvis GmbH & Co. KG for the solar and system technology and from the company SorTech AG for the thermally-driven chiller unit. Private households and companies, who are interested in participating in this practice test, can apply by contacting Solvis or SorTech.

“The customer receives a complete system solution, fitted to his individual needs and serviced through to the end of the project in December 2012,” says Ralf Kynast from Solvis.

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Comments

john daglish said

17 March 2010
Only poorly designed buildings in the German climate require air-conditioning.
The building fabric should firstly be optimised with passive techniques, then low energy active techniques such as forced ventilation air night cooling should suffice in most cases. We also must not go down the line of overly tight temperature set points which do not allow thermal comfort adaptability but are well liked by the HVAC industry ... conventional or renewably sourced.

john daglish said

17 March 2010
Only poorly designed buildings in the German climate require air-conditioning.
The building fabric should firstly be optimised with passive techniques, then low energy active techniques such as forced ventilation air night cooling should suffice in most cases. We also must not go down the line of overly tight temperature set points which do not allow thermal comfort adaptability but are well liked by the HVAC industry ... conventional or renewably sourced.

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