Related Links

News

NEPGA highlights concerns with Northern Pass Transmission Project

The New England Power Generators Association (NEPGA) has issued a public policy position paper highlighting its concerns with the Northern Pass Transmission Project (NPTP).

By Kari Williamson

Sandi Hennequin, Vice President of NEPGA, says: “The Northern Pass Project is seeking special treatment and seeks to use the regulatory process to gain unfair advantages in the marketplace. This project is still, very much, in its formative stages. It is not much more than a lot of paper work and lines on a map, so there is plenty of opportunity to fix it.

“NEPGA is not opposed to the project per se, however, the Northern Pass Project is very controversial, and we appreciate that there is strong opposition. We do believe that the Northern Pass Project needs to follow the same rules as its competitors and operate on a level playing field.”

NEPGA outlines four main areas of concern:

  1. Eminent Domain: NEPGA is opposed to the project’s request to use eminent domain to take private property along the proposed route.
  2. Potentially Changes Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards: Representatives of the Northern Pass Project have suggested that they would want to change state laws to allow power from their project to qualify as renewable under Renewable Portfolio Standard programmes. NEPGA is opposed to making these changes as they are unnecessary and would undermine much of the economic underpinnings of the RPS strategy by exporting ratepayers’ dollars from the RPS outside of New England.
  3. Sole-Source, No-Bid Contracting: PSNH is proposing that New Hampshire state law be changed and the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) approve a 40-year power purchase agreement that will allow them to enter into a no-bid, sole-source contract with NPTP to purchase power and supply their default service customers. NEPGA opposes sole-source, no-bid contracting and has concerns regarding the appropriateness of PSNH contracting with a project in which they and their affiliates have commercial interest.
  4. Subsidies from Regulated Utilities: NEPGA is concerned about the special treatment that NPTP receives from PSNH. It would be better for the process if PSNH removed itself from its ties to the NPTP and instead more properly focused on its role as a distribution utility.

Hennequin concludes: “The New England Power Generators Association plans to increase our regulatory and legislative advocacy surrounding the Northern Pass Transmission Project to ensure that a level playing field is maintained. We expect increased legislative, federal and state regulatory developments to ramp up in the months to come. In the end, the process would be better served if NPTP were to alter its structure and not seek special treatment. However, should the project proceed as proposed, NEPGA will actively participate in the policy and regulatory processes.”

Share this article

More services

 

This article is featured in:
Energy infrastructure

 

Comments

wilkinsonJ said

10 October 2011
I guess there is an echo when analyzing issues with the Northern Pass?
Thank you.
J.Wilkinson Informed and Concerned Citizen of No Corporation

wilkinsonJ said

07 October 2011
Consider who this counter point message is coming from - the spokesman for NP who suggests if the Northern Pass is allowed to be constructed that NH residents and NH businesses will be able to acquire lower cost electrical rates. For some time now NP has admitted that if it's allowed to be built through the entire length of the state of NH, it would only provide comparable, existing power rates. NH already has some of the highest electrical rates in this nation and will continue to if, the only for profit, Northern Pass is allowed too be implemented. This is unneeded and undesired.
Thank you.
J.Wilkinson Informed and Concerned Citizen of No Corporation

wilkinsonJ said

07 October 2011
Consider who this counter point message is coming from - the spokesman for NP who suggests if the Northern Pass is allowed to be constructed that NH residents and NH businesses will be able to acquire lower cost electrical rates. For some time now NP has admitted that if it's allowed to be built through the entire length of the state of NH, it would only provide comparable, existing power rates. NH already has some of the highest electrical rates in this nation and will continue to if, the only for profit, Northern Pass is allowed too be implemented. This is unneeded and undesired.
Thank you.
J.Wilkinson Informed and Concerned Citizen of No Corporation

murrame said

05 October 2011

Consider who this message is coming from – the NEPGA member companies are corporations who will have to compete with the lower cost, reliable, clean energy that the Northern Pass project will provide to the New England region.

Northern Pass will displace their more expensive and dirtier sources of energy, cutting into their profits. Homeowners, small businesses and other customers, meanwhile, will benefit from this lower cost power by saving $200 to $300 million dollars per year, according to the Charles River Associates study that is included among the projects filings at http://northernpass.us/
Thank you.
M.Murray Northern Pass Transmission.

Note: The majority of comments posted are created by members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those Elsevier Ltd. We are not responsible for any content posted by members of the public or content of any third party sites that are accessible through this site. Any links to third party websites from this website do not amount to any endorsement of that site by the Elsevier Ltd and any use of that site by you is at your own risk. For further information, please refer to our Terms & Conditions.

Comment on this article

You must be registered and logged in to leave a comment about this article.